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Monitor Lizard

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Monitor Lizard Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
Chordata
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum
Reptilia
Order:
A group of animals within a class
Squamata
Family:
A group of animals within an order
Varanidae
Genus:
A group of animals within a family
Varanus
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species
Varanus Indicus
Type:
The animal group that the species belongs to
Reptile
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats
Omnivore
Size:
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
12-310cm (4.7-122in)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
1-166kg (2.2-366lbs)
Top Speed:
The fastest recorded speed of the animal
45km/h (28mph)
Life Span:
How long the animal lives for
8-30 years
Lifestyle:
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable
Solitary
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Threatened
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Tan, Brown, Grey, Green
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Scales
Favourite Food:Rodents
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives
River banks and coastal forests
Average Litter Size:
The average number of babies born at once
10
Main Prey:Rodents, Snakes, Lizards
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Human, Snakes, Wildcats
Special Features:Large, powerful body and sharp claws

Monitor Lizard Location

Map of Monitor Lizard Locations

Monitor Lizard

Monitor Lizards are large reptiles found in Africa and all across Asia, including the surrounding seas. The monitor lizard is mainly found in jungle areas although some species of monitor lizard are water-bound.

Some species of monitor lizard are thought to carry a fairly weak venom, for example, the komodo dragon which is the largest of the species. The komodo dragon is native to the small Indonesian island that it is named after and is the largest species of lizard in the world.

According to legend, monitor lizards were a sign that there were crocodiles close by, possibly due to their standing on their hind legs to monitor their surroundings. Monitor lizards do this so that they are aware of any approaching predators.

Although many species of monitor lizard are quite big, some species of monitor lizard are smaller than 20 cm in length. Monitor lizards are extremely versatile animals and monitor lizards adapt well into different environments.

Most species of monitor lizard have a predominantly carnivorous diet, eating eggs, smaller reptiles, fish, birds and small mammals. Some species of monitor lizard also eat fruit and vegetation depending on where they live.

Female monitor lizards bury their eggs in holes or hollow tree stumps that the female monitor lizard then covers with dirt in order to protect her eggs. Monitor lizards can lay up to 30 eggs at a time, although many monitor lizards lay less, and only a lucky few of the monitor lizard babies tend to survive.

Monitor lizards are thought to be fairly intelligent animals, with some people claiming that monitor lizards are able to recognise numbers up to six, therefore meaning that monitor lizards are able to count! Monitor lizards mainly use their intelligence in the wild by surveying areas for oncoming danger and for hunting their prey.

Monitor Lizard Comments

Lolsbarry224
"SOOO cute! i want one."
qadan
"wow"
qadan
"wow"
???
"awsome site it rocks"
Anonymous
"awsome site it rocks"
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First Published: 10th November 2008, Last Updated: 9th January 2017 [View Sources]

Sources:
1. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 10 Nov 2008]
2. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
3. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 10 Nov 2008]
4. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2009]
5. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 10 Nov 2008]

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