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Black Rhinoceros

Black Rhinoceros, Masai Mara, KenyaBlack Rhino, ZOO, Czech RepublicBlack Rhino, ZOO, Czech RepublicBlack Rhinoceros, Masai Mara, KenyaBlack Rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) at Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania
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Black Rhinoceros Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
Chordata
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum
Mammalia
Order:
A group of animals within a class
Perissodactyla
Family:
A group of animals within an order
Rhinocerotidae
Genus:
A group of animals within a family
Diceros
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species
Diceros Bicornis
Type:
The animal group that the species belongs to
Mammal
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats
Herbivore
Size(L):3.3m - 3.6m (11ft - 12ft)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
800kg - 1,400kg (1,800lbs - 3,100lbs)
Top Speed:
The fastest recorded speed of the animal
42km/h (30mph)
Life Span:
How long the animal lives for
45-50 years
Lifestyle:
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable
Solitary
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Critically Endangered
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Brown, Grey, White
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Leather
Favourite Food:Grass
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives
Tropical bushland, grassland and savannas
Average Litter Size:
The average number of babies born at once
1
Main Prey:Grass, Fruit, Berries, Leaves
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Human, Wild cats
Special Features:Hard, thick skin and two large horns

Black Rhinoceros Location

Map of Black Rhinoceros Locations
Map of Africa

Black Rhinoceros

The black rhinoceros (also known as the hook-lipped rhinoceros) is a large species of rhinoceros native to Africa. Despite its name, the black rhinoceros is actually fairly light in colour with most black rhinoceros individuals having either white or grey skin.

Historically, the black rhinoceros had a vast range across central and eastern Africa in countries including Kenya, Tanzania, Cameroon, South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, and Angola. Although the black rhinoceros is still found in these countries today, their numbers are very few and far between.

The black rhinoceros is one of the larger rhinoceros species with the horns of the black rhinoceros known to reach 1.5 meters in length. The black rhinoceros uses its horns are used for defence, intimidation, digging up roots and breaking branches during feeding. The horns of the black rhinoceros are made from a substance called keratin and are therefore very strong. The horns of the black rhinoceros are used in ancient medicine and many black rhinos have been illegally poached for them.

The black rhinoceros has relatively poor eyesight, relying more on hearing and smell to detect what is going on around them. The ears of the black rhinoceros possess a relatively wide rotational range to detect sounds and an excellent sense of smell to readily alert them to the presence of predators.

The black rhinoceros is a herbivorous animal meaning that it sustains itself on a purely plant based diet. Black rhinos browse the densely vegetated savanna for leaves, flowers, buds, fruits, berries and roots which they dig up from the ground using their horns.

Due to its large size, the black rhino's only real predator in the wild are large wild cats such as lions that will prey on the black rhino calves and weak individuals. Humans are the biggest threat to the black rhinoceros as they have been hunted to the brink of extinction for their horns.

The black rhinoceros is a solitary animal and only comes together with other black rhinos to mate. The female black rhinoceros gives birth to a single calf after a gestation period that is over a year long. The black rhinoceros calf remains with its mother until it is at least 2 years old and big enough to become independent.

Today, the black rhinoceros is a critically endangered animal said to be on the brink of extinction in the wild. There are only a handful of black rhinoceros individuals left in the wild, but reports suggest that black rhinoceros population numbers are now beginning to increase due to continued conservation efforts.

Black Rhinoceros Translations

Bosanski
Crni nosorog
Català
Rinoceront negre
Cesky
Nosorožec dvourohý
Dansk
Sort næsehorn
Deutsch
Spitzmaulnashorn
English
Black Rhinoceros
Español
Diceros bicornis
Eesti
Teravmokk-ninasarvik
Suomi
Suippohuulisarvikuono
Français
Rhinocéros noir
עִבְרִית
קרנף צר שפה
Hrvatski
Crni nosorog
Magyar
Keskenyszájú orrszarvú
Bahasa Indonesia
Badak Hitam
Italiano
Diceros bicornis
日本語
クロサイ
Latina
Diceros
Bahasa Melayu
Badak Hitam
Nederlands
Zwarte neushoorn
Polski
Nosorożec czarny
Português
Rinoceronte-negro
Slovenščina
Črni nosorog
Svenska
Spetsnoshörning
Türkçe
Kara gergedan
Tiếng Việt
Tê giác đen
中文
黑犀

Black Rhinoceros Comments

Marly
"I love all animals"
Anonymous
"thanks for the help with my project"
Anonymous
"So cool "
Anonymous
"So cool "
Rhino Luv
"Working on a project. Thanks for the info!"
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First Published: 6th July 2010, Last Updated: 16th February 2017 [View Sources]

Sources:
1. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 06 Jul 2010]
2. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
3. David W. Macdonald, Oxford University Press (2010) The Encyclopedia Of Mammals [Accessed at: 06 Jul 2010]
4. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 06 Jul 2010]
5. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 06 Jul 2010]
6. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 06 Jul 2010]

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