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Kudu

Baby kudu, Lewa game park, Kenya.Three greater kudus amongst brown grass in Ruaha in Tanzania.Lesser Kudu (Tragelaphus imberbis)Greater Kudu in Kruger ParkFemale Kudu and a couple of Black-faced Impala at Chudop waterhole, Etosha National Park in Namibia.A Kudu (Tragelaphus Strepsiceros) at Colchester Zoo, UK.Greater Kudu, South AfricaMale Greater Kudu, Kruger National Park, South Africa
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Kudu Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
Chordata
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum
Mammalia
Order:
A group of animals within a class
Artiodactyla
Family:
A group of animals within an order
Bovidae
Genus:
A group of animals within a family
Tragelaphus
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species
Tragelaphus Strepsiceros
Type:
The animal group that the species belongs to
Mammal
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats
Herbivore
Size:
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
0.8-1.2m (31-47in)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
120-256kg (265-565lbs)
Top Speed:
The fastest recorded speed of the animal
95km/h (60mph)
Life Span:
How long the animal lives for
8-14 years
Lifestyle:
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable
Herd
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Least Concern
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Brown, Grey, Red
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Hair
Favourite Food:Leaves
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives
Shrub woodland and savanna plains
Average Litter Size:
The average number of babies born at once
1
Main Prey:Leaves, Herbs, Fruit, Flowers
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Lions, Leopards, Wild Dogs
Special Features:Large ears and white stripes on body

Kudu Location

Map of Kudu Locations
Map of Africa

Kudu

The kudu is a sub-species of antelope that is found inhabiting mixed shrub woodland, and savanna plains in eastern and southern Africa. The kudu relies heavily on close, dense thickets in which the kudu can escape to and hide when it feels threatened.

There are two species of kudu in Africa which are the Lesser kudu and the Greater kudu. Both kudu species are closely related and look very similar in appearance but there are a few distinctive ways that the lesser kudu and the greater kudu can be distinguished from one another. The lesser kudu has ten white stripes which run vertically down the lesser kudu's body where the greater kudu can have anyway between 4 and 12 stripes. The greater kudu is also generally bigger than the lesser kudu

Kudus are herbivorous animals and therefore have a completely vegetarian diet. Kudus forage in woodland and around thickets of shrubs nibbling on leaves from the trees and bushes. Kudus also eat other varieties of plant life such as herbs, flowers, berries and fallen fruits.

Kudus are prey to a number of predators such as lions, leopards, cheetahs, wild dogs and the occasional large python that will hunt the smaller and more vulnerable kudu young. Kudu are able to run very fast but often have a hard time outrunning predators so the kudu rely on their agile ability to leap into forest and woodland where large carnivorous predators find it harder to chase them. The kudu will then often hide in woodland until the predator have eventually given up and left.

Kudus live in small herds of up to 24 kudu individuals. The kudu herds mainly consist of female kudus and their calves as male kudus tend to solitary and only come together with other kudus when it is time to mate. It has been known that groups of up to 8 male kudus will form a herd but this is very rare.

The kudu mating season occurs at the end of the rainy season. The kudu gestation period is around 8 months after which time the female kudu will normally give birth to just one baby kudu. The baby kudus tend to be born around February and March when the grass is at it's highest and there is plenty of food to help the baby kudu calves to grow.

Kudus have both benefited and suffered from contact with humans. Humans find the kudu and easy target for hunting due to the fact that kudus tend to stop and look around after they have run away. Some local tribes people believe the kudu to be a sacred animal and therefore protect the kudu rather than killing it. Human settlements have also meant that the kudu habitat as changed and the kudu have had to move to other areas. This has actually done the kudu population the world of good as the kudu have been pushed into areas where there is a better source of water and therefore food.

Kudu Comments

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First Published: 30th June 2009, Last Updated: 22nd February 2017 [View Sources]

Sources:
1. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 30 Jun 2009]
2. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
3. David W. Macdonald, Oxford University Press (2010) The Encyclopedia Of Mammals [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2010]
4. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 30 Jun 2009]
5. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 30 Jun 2009]
6. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 30 Jun 2009]

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