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Quoll

Spotted QuollTiger Quoll (Dasyurus maculatus)Eastern Quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus)A black Eastern QuollA Tiger Quoll in the Billabong Koala and Wildlife Park
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Quoll Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
Chordata
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum
Mammalia
Order:
A group of animals within a class
Dasyuromorphia
Family:
A group of animals within an order
Dasyuridae
Genus:
A group of animals within a family
Dasyurus
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species
Dasyurus Viverrinus
Type:
The animal group that the species belongs to
Mammal
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats
Omnivore
Size:
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
35-75cm (14-29.5in)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
1.3-7kg (3-15.4lbs)
Top Speed:
The fastest recorded speed of the animal
24km/h (15mph)
Life Span:
How long the animal lives for
3-6 years
Lifestyle:
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable
Solitary
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Threatened
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Black, Brown, White, Grey, Tan
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Fur
Favourite Food:Fruit
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives
Woodland and grassland
Average Litter Size:
The average number of babies born at once
4
Main Prey:Fruit, Nuts, Small animals and reptiles
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Human, Snakes, Crocodiles
Special Features:Elongated snout and long, bushy tail

Quoll Location

Map of Quoll Locations
Map of Oceania

Quoll

The quoll is a medium-sized marsupial, natively found in parts of Australia, Papua New Guinea and Tasmania. The quoll is often known as the native cat, due to the cat-like appearance of the quoll.

Quolls are found occupying woodland, shrubland and grassy habitats across Australia and New Guinea. Although quolls have been seen climbing trees, the quoll tends to live life on the ground.

The quoll is a nocturnal animal meaning that it spends the nights hunting and the daytimes hours resting. Unlike many other nocturnal mammals, the quoll enjoys to spend the sunlit days basking in the heat rather than hiding in a crevice or underground.

There are six different species of quoll, found across Papua New guinea and Australia. The Bronze quoll and the New Guinean quoll are natively found on the tropical island of Papua New Guinea. The Western quoll, the Northern quoll and the Tiger quoll are all natively found on the Australian mainland. Although the Eastern quoll was originally found on the Australian mainland, they are more commonly found on the island Tasmania.

Although the quoll is an omnivorous animal, the quoll is has a predominantly meat-based diet. Quoll hunt during the darkness of night, searching for small mammals, birds, small reptiles and insects. The quoll also feasts on nuts, grasses and fruits when they are available.

The quoll (particularly the tiger) quoll is an apex predators in it's environment as they are one of the largest species of carnivorous marsupial in the world. The main predators of the quoll are generally human hunters, large snakes and crocodiles.

The quoll is a marsupial, meaning that the female quoll has a pouch on her tummy for her young to develop in. The baby quolls are born after a gestation period of just a few weeks, when they crawl up into the mother's pouch. The baby quolls are nursed in the pouch of the female quoll for about 2 months but are not fully independent until they are nearly 6 months old.

Quoll Comments

Anonymous
"This is SUPER DUPER helpful for my project!"
Anonymous
"This is SUPER DUPER helpful for my project!"
perrie
"im doing a school report on it."
Lola
"Awesome"
Lilly
"TO CUTE!!!! I'm doing a report on them!"
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First Published: 19th October 2009, Last Updated: 9th January 2017 [View Sources]

Sources:
1. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 19 Oct 2009]
2. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
3. David W. Macdonald, Oxford University Press (2010) The Encyclopedia Of Mammals [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2010]
4. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 19 Oct 2009]
5. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 19 Oct 2009]
6. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 19 Oct 2009]

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