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Swan

Mute Swan on the River OrwellMute SwansA Mute Swan at Alton Water, TattingstoneA Mute Swan at Alton Water, TattingstoneA dominant male Mute Swan at RSPB Minsmere ReserveMute Swan on the River OrwellMute Swan on the River OrwellMute Swan in a London ParkCygnet in a London Park
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Swan Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
Chordata
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum
Aves
Order:
A group of animals within a class
Anseriformes
Family:
A group of animals within an order
Anatidae
Genus:
A group of animals within a family
Cygnus
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species
Cygnus Atratus
Type:
The animal group that the species belongs to
Bird
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats
Omnivore
Size (L):
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
91cm - 150cm (36in - 60in)
Wing Span:
The measurement from one wing tip to the other
200cm - 350cm (79in - 138in)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
10kg - 15kg (22lbs - 33lbs)
Top Speed:
The fastest recorded speed of the animal
80km/h (50mph)
Life Span:
How long the animal lives for
8 - 12 years
Lifestyle:
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable
Flock
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Threatened
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Black, White, Grey, Orange
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Feathers
Favourite Food:Aquatic Plants
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives
Large, shallow wetlands and open water
Average Clutch Size:
The average number of eggs laif at once
5
Main Prey:Aquatic Plants, Insects, Small Fish
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Human, Wolf, Raccoon
Distinctive Features:
Characteristics unique to the animal
Large, powerful wings and webbed feet

Swan Location

Map of Swan Locations

Swan

The swan is a large aquatic bird closely related to geese and ducks. The swan is known for it's fierce temperament and the swans incredibly strong wings which are said to be able to cause dangerous (sometimes fatal) injuries to any animal the swan feels threatened by.

The swan is found on both sides of the Equator across the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The northern swan is generally white in colour with an orange beak and the southern swan tends to be a mixture of white and black in colour with red, orange or black beaks.

The Australian black swan has been noted to only swim with one leg, the other being tucked above it's tail. This helps the swan to change direction more smoothly when the swan is swimming on the surface of the water, should the swan spot food or even an oncoming predator.

Swans are omnivorous birds but have a very vegetarian diet. Swans eat underwater vegetation such as seaweed and aquatic plants when they are on the water and a mixture of plants, seeds and berries when they are on land. Swans also eat insects both water and land based and the occasional small fish.

Due to their large size, swans have few natural predators in the wild. The swan's main predator is the human who hunts the swan for it's meat and it's feathers. Other predators of the swan include wolves, raccoons and foxes they prey both on the swan itself but also on it's eggs.

Although swans do not mate for life, couples establish strong bonds between one another and can often mate for a few years. Swans build their nests on land out of twigs and leaves, and the female swan lays between 3 and 9 eggs. The baby swans (known as cygnets) hatch out of their eggs after an incubation of just over a month. The cygnets are often on the water with their mother swan within a couple of days and stay close to her for both protection and warmth. The mother swan will guard her baby swans furiously from predators or any animal that she believes is a threat.

Swans have many adaptations in order to successfully survive life on the water such as their streamline body shape, long neck and webbed feet. The wings of the swan are also very strong meaning that the swan is one of the few heavy birds that is able to fly, even if it is only a short distance.

There are around 7 different species of swan found around the world. The size, colour and behaviour a swan individual is largely dependent on it's species and the area in which it lives.

Today swans are a threatened species of animal mainly due to hunting and habitat loss. Pollution (mainly water pollution) is also a major reason as why the swan populations are declining. Humans kept swans for many years for their meat, but today have more respect for the conservation of the swan and keep more sustainable animal food sources.

Swan Comments

Kelly Jo
"Thank you A-Z Animals! This is a great resource for school projects!"
Isley Swan
"Black Swans are my favorite thanks for the information!"
unknown person
"everything is great here!!!"
barack obama
"this website is great and my children use it for almost all of their school projects including animals and anything else you can find here"
Jada Tolbert
"Theses are very useful information abput swans. THANK YOU!!!!"
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First Published: 10th November 2008, Last Updated: 9th January 2017 [View Sources]

Sources:
1. Christopher Perrins, Oxford University Press (2009) The Encyclopedia Of Birds [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2009]
2. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 10 Nov 2008]
3. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
4. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 10 Nov 2008]
5. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2009]
6. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 10 Nov 2008]

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