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Goose (Branta)Greylag Geese with goslings at RSPB Minsmere ReserveGreylag Geese, TattingstoneGreylag Geese, TattingstoneCanadian Geese nesting on the River OrwellCanadian GooseA Greylag Goose sitting on a nest at RSPB Minsmere ReserveCanadian GeeseEgyptian Goose
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Goose Facts

Five groups that classify all living things
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
A group of animals within a pylum
A group of animals within a class
A group of animals within an order
A group of animals within a family
Scientific Name:
Comprised of the genus followed by the species
The animal group that the species belongs to
What kind of foods the animal eats
Size (L):
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
60cm - 120cm (23.6in - 50in)
Wing Span:
The measurement from one wing tip to the other
83cm - 170cm (32.7in - 68in)
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
1.5kg - 8kg (3.3lbs - 17lbs)
Top Speed:
The fastest recorded speed of the animal
90km/h (55mph)
Life Span:
How long the animal lives for
12 - 26 years
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Least Concern
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Grey, Brown, Black, White
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Favourite Food:Grass
The specific area where the animal lives
Large ponds, rivers and lake shores
Average Clutch Size:
The average number of eggs laif at once
Main Prey:Grass, Seeds, Berries
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Fox, Owl, Raccoon, Wild dogs
Distinctive Features:
Characteristics unique to the animal
Long neck and noisy communication calls

Goose Location

Map of Goose Locations


A goose is a medium to large sized bird found in Europe, Asia and North America. There are around 29 known species of geese around the world including Canadian geese and Snowy geese.

Geese mate and build their nests in order to raise their baby geese (known as goslings) in the north during the warmer summer months and the geese then migrate south in the winter to the warmer climates when the baby geese are strong enough to fly.

Geese tend to have the same mating partners for their entire lives, and if not all of it then most of it. The bond between male and female geese partners is very strong and they will often spend most of their time together with both the male goose and the female goose building the nest and raising their young.

Geese are omnivorous birds but mainly feed on insects, grubs, small fish and plankton in the water. Geese spend a great deal of time on the water and have special adaptations such as webbed feet which make their aquatic life easier.

Geese have a number of natural predators although, due to the size and strength of a goose, predatory animals don't always have an easy time if they fancy goose for dinner. The main predators of the goose are foxes, wild dogs, raccoons and birds that predominately prey on the goose eggs and newborn baby geese. Humans are among one of the most common predators of geese, as geese are hunted all around the world for their meat and feathers.

Geese are strong and hardy birds and are known to get to old ages, even in the wild. The average lifespan of a goose is between 20 and 30 years but a number of geese individuals have been known to live for much longer.

Geese are known to have extremely strong wings as they migrate long distances every year to the warmer climates. Due to the fact that the wingspan of a goose is so large (normally one and half times the size of the goose's body), and the wings of the goose are so strong, a goose is known to be able to inflict severe damage to humans should it become threatened or annoyed!

Not only do geese flap their wings to intimidate unwanted company, but they are also known to make a loud hissing noise. If these methods of defence fail, it is not uncommon for a goose to simply charge at the intruder hissing and flapping it's wings all at the same time.

The term geese is normally used to refer to these birds in general, but more particularly a female. The term gander is generally used to refer to a male.. The baby geese are referred to as goslings and a group of geese on the ground is called a gaggle with geese flying in formation being called a wedge or a skein.

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First Published: 17th September 2009, Last Updated: 9th January 2017 [View Sources]

1. Christopher Perrins, Oxford University Press (2009) The Encyclopedia Of Birds [Accessed at: 17 Sep 2009]
2. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 17 Sep 2009]
3. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
4. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 17 Sep 2009]
5. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 17 Sep 2009]
6. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 17 Sep 2009]

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