Animals >>

Fire-Bellied Toad

Fire-Bellied Toad (Bombina)Fire-Bellied Toad (Bombina)Fire-Bellied Toad (Bombina)Fire-Bellied Toad (Bombina)
[Jump to Article]

Fire-Bellied Toad Facts

Kingdom:
Five groups that classify all living things
Animalia
Phylum:
A group of animals within the animal kingdom
Chordata
Class:
A group of animals within a pylum
Amphibia
Order:
A group of animals within a class
Anura
Family:
A group of animals within an order
Bombinatoridae
Genus:
A group of animals within a family
Bombina
Scientific Name:
The name of the animal in science
Bombina
Type:
The animal group that the species belongs to
Amphibian
Diet:
What kind of foods the animal eats
Carnivore
Size (L):
How long (L) or tall (H) the animal is
4cm - 7cm (1.5in - 3in)
Weight:
The measurement of how heavy the animal is
20g - 80g (0.7oz - 2.8oz)
Top Speed:
The fastest recorded speed of the animal
8km/h (5mph)
Lifespan:
How long the animal lives for
10 - 15 years
Lifestyle:
Whether the animal is solitary or sociable
Solitary
Conservation Status:
The likelihood of the animal becoming extinct
Least Concern
Colour:
The colour of the animal's coat or markings
Black, Green, Grey, Brown, Yellow, Orange, Red
Skin Type:
The protective layer of the animal
Permeable
Favourite Food:
The preferred food of this animal
Insects
Habitat:
The specific area where the animal lives
Forests, jungle and marshes
Average Clutch Size:
The average number of eggs laid at once
200
Main Prey:
The food that the animal gains energy from
Insects, Worms, Spiders
Predators:
Other animals that hunt and eat the animal
Foxes, Snakes, Birds
Distinctive Features:
Characteristics unique to this animal
Brightly coloured belly and long toes

Fire-Bellied Toad Location

Map of Fire-Bellied Toad Locations

Fire-Bellied Toad

The fire-bellied toad is small to medium-sized species of toad that is found naturally across mainland Europe and northern and central Asia. The fire-bellied toad is most commonly known for the brightly-coloured markings on its body, which are predominantly found on the underside of the fire-bellied toad.

The fire-bellied toad is found close to water in a variety of different habitats. Forest, woodland, temperate rainforests, marshlands, swamps and even farmland, often provides the perfect home for the fire-bellied toad. The fire-bellied toad also spends a great deal of time in water from tiny freshwater, mountain streams to large slow-flowing rivers and lakes.

There are eight different species of fire-bellied toad found throughout Europe and Asia. Despite varying slightly in size and colour, the different species of fire-bellied toad all look fairly similar having bumpy skin, webbed toes and eyes on the top of their heads. The different species of fire-bellied toad of so similar that two in particular are able to interbreed and produce fertile offspring.

The skin colour of the fire-bellied toad depends on the species but can range from brown to yellow, to green, to orange and even white. The skin of the fire-bellied toad is known to be toxic to some animals including humans.

The fire-bellied toad is a carnivorous animal as the fire-bellied toad has a diet that mainly consists of small invertebrates like bugs and insects. The fire-bellied toad is able to catch its prey by shooting out its long, sticky tongue which grabs onto the insect and pulls it into the open mouth of the fire-bellied toad. The fire-bellied toad is also known to eat spiders, larvae and the odd worm.

Due to its small size, the fire-bellied toad has numerous predators within its natural environment. Foxes, cats, snakes, lizards and birds are the most common predators of the fire-bellied toad along with some species of large fish. The eggs and tadpoles of the fire-bellied toad also have a number of aquatic predators in the water.

The fire-bellied toad mates during the late spring, when the female fire-bellied toad lays between 50 and 300 sticky eggs onto a plant stem or leaf that hangs over the water. The eggs of the fire-bellied toad are joined together and are known as toadspawn, but it can take a couple of years before the fire-bellied toad tadpoles have full transformed into adult toads.

Fire-Bellied Toad Comments

unicorn
"i really like this website"
alexis
"Getting one as a pet. So exited"
meow mix man
"it helped me alot"
meow mix man
"it helped me alot"
Anonymous
"perfect for my science project for school"
Showing 5 of 12 comments.
Show More Comments

Post Comment

Please enter a nickname which you can use to identify your comment, but which others can not use to identify you. Please do not use your online usernames/handles which you use for social networking.

Article Tools

Add to Phobia Filter
Update your Fire-Bellied Toad phobia filter.
Print Article
View printer friendly version of Fire-Bellied Toad article.
Source/Reference Article
Learn how you can use or cite the Fire-Bellied Toad article in your website content, school work and other projects.

First Published: 18th January 2010, Last Updated: 10th September 2018

Sources:
1. David Burnie, Dorling Kindersley (2008) Illustrated Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 18 Jan 2010]
2. David Burnie, Kingfisher (2011) The Kingfisher Animal Encyclopedia [Accessed at: 01 Jan 2011]
3. Dorling Kindersley (2006) Dorling Kindersley Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 18 Jan 2010]
4. Richard Mackay, University of California Press (2009) The Atlas Of Endangered Species [Accessed at: 18 Jan 2010]
5. Tom Jackson, Lorenz Books (2007) The World Encyclopedia Of Animals [Accessed at: 18 Jan 2010]

Are you Safe?

Are you Safe? is an online safety campaign by A-Z-Animals.com. If something has upset you, the Are you Safe? campaign can help you to speak to someone who can help you.

Are you Safe?
Subscribe to A-Z Animals and enjoy our website without advertising! Subscribe Now