Sedge Warbler

Acrocephalus schoenobaenus

Last updated: September 9, 2022
Verified by: AZ Animals Staff
Image Credit vitalii_otroshko/Shutterstock.com

Males never sing the same song twice

Sedge Warbler Scientific Classification

Kingdom
Animalia
Phylum
Chordata
Class
Aves
Order
Passeriformes
Family
Acrocephalidae
Genus
Acrocephalus
Scientific Name
Acrocephalus schoenobaenus

Read our Complete Guide to Classification of Animals.

Sedge Warbler Conservation Status

Sedge Warbler Locations

Sedge Warbler Locations

Sedge Warbler Facts

Prey
They eat insects like aphids, moths, beetles, spiders, and slugs
Name Of Young
Chicks
Group Behavior
  • Social
  • Pair
Fun Fact
Males never sing the same song twice
Estimated Population Size
12 to 22 million
Biggest Threat
Drought
Most Distinctive Feature
Complex songs
Distinctive Feature
Brown and black streaked plumage
Wingspan
6 to 10 inches
Incubation Period
13 to 15 days
Age Of Independence
3 to 4 weeks
Age Of Fledgling
11 to 12 days
Habitat
wet grasslands and lowland rainforests
Diet
Insectivore
Lifestyle
  • Diurnal
Type
Bird
Common Name
Sedge warbler
Special Features
strong, pointed bill
Location
Europe, Africa, Western Asia
Nesting Location
In reed beds near water
Migratory
1

Sedge Warbler Physical Characteristics

Color
  • Brown
  • Black
  • Tan
Skin Type
Feathers
Lifespan
2 to 10 years
Weight
0.42 ounces
Length
4.5 to 5.1 inches

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Their songs can mimic other species.

The sedge warbler is a medium-sized bird with complex songs and interesting mating behavior. They have an extensive range that covers three continents and migrates long distances to their breeding and wintering grounds. Discover everything there is to know about this warbler, including where they live, how they mate, and how to identify them.

5 Amazing Sedge Warbler Facts

  • The oldest recorded sedge warbler was a banded warbler caught in Finland, reaching ten years and one month.
  • Males never sing the same song twice. Females choose their mates based on who has the most complex phrases.
  • Sedge warblers have an enormous population and an extensive range spanning over 100 countries on three continents.
  • This species is usually monogamous, but some males participate in a polygamous lifestyle and mate with many females.
  • They feed at dawn and dusk when the weather is cooler, thus immobilizing much of their insect prey.

Where to Find the Sedge Warbler

The sedge warbler inhabits over 100 countries in Europe, Africa, and Asia, from Finland to Siberia, down to Botswana and South Africa. These long-distance migrants have an enormous range, spending their springs and summers throughout Europe and Western Asia before migrating to their wintering homes in most parts of Africa. They breed in lowlands and valleys in cooler regions near water, and in winter, you can find them in wet grasslands and lowland rain forests. However, you can occasionally spot them in the drier brush, thickets, or desert scrub. Studies in Nigeria and Uganda suggest these birds return yearly to the same wintering grounds. Look for these birds perched on reeds and listen for their unusual and complicated songs.

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Locations

  1. Europe
  2. All of Africa, except the southwestern tip
  3. Western Asia

Sedge Warbler Nest

Females build their nest near water in vegetation, such as reed beds and sedge marshes, typically on the ground. She forms a cup-shaped structure with an outer layer of grass, stems, weeds, and spider webs. She lines the inside with a thick layer of reed flowers, animal hair, and plant down. 

Scientific Name

The sedge warbler (Acrocephalus Schoenobaenus) is from the Acrocephalidae family, which consists of singing perching birds, such as reed, marsh, and acrocephalid warblers. Their genus, Acrocephalus, is Ancient Greek for “highest head,” but “sharp-pointed” may be the proper translation. Its specific name, Schoenobaenus, is also Ancient Greek and means “reed” and “to tread.” The sedge warbler has no recognized subspecies.

Size, Appearance, and Behavior

This species is a medium-sized warbler, measuring 4.5 to 5.1 inches long and weighing around 0.42 ounces. Their wingspan is 6 to 10 inches. Both adult sexes have the same brown plumage with heavily streaked backs and paler undersides. It has a flattened forehead and black streaks on its crown with a strong, pointed bill. Juveniles have dark spots on their breast. The average lifespan is only two years, but they’ve been known to live as long as ten years.

Males arrive at their breeding grounds two weeks before the females to select their territories. During courting, males perform elaborate flight displays and singing. Females choose their mates based on their complex song phrases. Males never sing the same tune twice, and females appreciate an extensive repertoire. Their tunes can also mimic other species. The sedge warbler is usually monogamous, but there are also polygamous individuals who mate with many females. Males are often more social before they form pair bonds. 

A sedge warbler singing while perched vertically on a reed
Both male and female adult sedge warblers have the same brown plumage.

Alex Cooper Photography/Shutterstock.com

Migration Pattern and Timing

Sedge warblers are long-distance migrants. They spend their springs and summers in Europe and Western Asia, as far north as Scandinavia and Siberia. It flies south during migration to winter in Sub Saharan Africa, as far south as the eastern coast of South Africa. They reach their wintering grounds from mid-September to December, depending on how far south they travel. They are back on their breeding grounds from mid-March to early May.

Diet

Sedge warblers are primarily insectivorous but may supplement their diet with berries.

What Does the Sedge Warbler Eat?

The sedge warbler eats aphids, moths, beetles, spiders, slugs, snails, worms, grasshoppers, flies, and insect larvae. It will consume berries, such as elderberry and blackberry, in its wintering habitats. On the African continent, it’s known for eating flowers and other fruits. Before migration, they will double their fat reserves for nonstop flights. They feed at dawn and dusk in low, dense vegetation, where they pick insects from plants. Sometimes you can observe them hovering or “leap-catching” flying insects.

Predators, Threats, and Conservation Status

The IUCN lists the sedge warbler as LC or “least concern.” Due to its extensive range and vast, stable population, this species does not qualify for “threatened” status. However, they had a significant decline in their West African wintering quarters from severe drought in the past. The effects of global warming may change their population size in the future.

What Eats the Sedge Warbler?

Not much is known about the sedge warbler’s predators, but they may have similar threats as other warblers. Their possible predators include squirrels, raccoons, foxes, weasels, crows, jays, and snakes. They’ve also been witnessed performing alarm calls against doves, cuckoos, and sparrowhawks.

Reproduction, Young, and Molting

The breeding season begins in the spring, and egg laying begins in late April to mid-May, depending on the region. The female lays five to six light green eggs with olive markings. She incubates them by herself for 13 to 15 days, but both parents help with feeding duties. The young leave the nest 11 to 12 days after hatching but won’t be entirely independent for another two to three weeks. They have an average lifespan of two years but can live as long as ten.

Population

The sedge warbler’s global estimated population is between 12 million and 22 million mature individuals. Europe contains 60% of its worldwide range and estimates its breeding population to be between 3.8 and 6.5 million pairs. The IUCN suggests their current population trend is stable with no extreme fluctuations.

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About the Author

Niccoy is a professional writer and content creator focusing on nature, wildlife, food, and travel. She graduated Kappa Beta Delta from Florida State College with a business degree before realizing writing was her true passion. She lives in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains and enjoys hiking, reading, and cooking!

Sedge Warbler FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions) 

Where do sedge warblers live?

They breed in lowlands and valleys in cooler regions near water, and in winter, you can find them in wet grasslands and lowland rainforests.

Where do sedge warblers nest?

Females build their nest near water in vegetation, such as reed beds and sedge marshes, typically on the ground.

What does a sedge warbler eat?

The sedge warbler eats aphids, moths, beetles, spiders, slugs, snails, worms, grasshoppers, flies, and insect larvae.

Do sedge warblers migrate?

Sedge warblers are long-distance migrants. They spend their springs and summers in Europe and Western Asia and winter in Sub-Saharan Africa.

How big are sedge warblers?

This species is a medium-sized warbler, measuring 4.5 to 5.1 inches long and weighing around 0.42 ounces.

Are sedge warblers endangered?

The IUCN lists the sedge warbler as LC or “least concern.” However, they are vulnerable to droughts.

How many eggs do sedge warblers lay?

The female lays five to six light green eggs with olive markings.

Sources
  1. IUCN Red List, Available here: https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/22714700/87569807
  2. British Birds, Available here: https://britishbirds.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/article_files/V69/V69_N10/V69_N10_P384_399_A077.pdf
  3. Science Direct, Available here: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2351989420307289

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